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Curriculum Connection – Fall 2002
 
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Explore Curriculum Connection guides, which are written to accompany each issue of Coastal Heritage, a quarterly publication of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium.

Coastal Heritage, Fall 2002 issue: South Carolina's Maritime History


High School

“Rise and Fall and Rise . . . South Carolina's Maritime History” is the lead article for Fall 2002. Have students read the article and create an inquiry lesson based on the article and following questions:

• What do you know about ports in general? What do you know about the Port of Charleston? Have students locate the port of Charleston on a map of South Carolina.

• Divide the class into small cooperative learning groups. Have each group use the article to create a timeline of the Charleston port. Assign each group a significant point on the timeline, for example the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825, and have the group present its historical significance.

• How has the port historically been tied to the economy of the Charleston area? How is the port tied to the economy of the modern-day Charleston area? How does the port affect the economy of South Carolina (how many jobs does the port create, are large corporations more likely to build in a state with a port, etc.)? Ask students to record the home country of the garments they are wearing, backpacks, handbags, wallets, etc. Divide the class into cooperative learning groups. Have each group use stickers to mark the countries of origin on a world map. Which region has the most stickers? What if you could only use products manufactured in your home state? How does the closing of a port affect the economy of a region (you may want to point out the recent California closing)?

Social Studies: 12.15.1

Language Arts Connection
Have each student, or small group of students, write a paper comparing and contrasting the economic impact of the port vs. the environmental impact of maintaining a viable port. Provide the students with newspaper articles regarding the expansion of the Charleston port. A search for “port” or “global gateway” at http://www.charleston.net will yield many results. Provide the students with time to research environmental and economic issues raised in the articles. Then, split the class into two groups Environmental and Economic. Have each group present an argument for or against port expansion. Students should not make general statements such as “the port is bad for the environment” without data to support the argument.

Following the debate, pose the question: “Do you feel that the attitudes of present-day Charlestonians toward port expansion on Daniel Island are similar to the attitudes of 19th-century Charlestonians toward railway expansion? Why or why not?” Divide the class into small groups to discuss the question, then have each group present its opinion to the class.

Social Studies: 12.9.10, 12.10.1

Vocabulary
Hinterland, infrastructure, hidebound, antebellum, stevedores

Acknowledgements
Special thanks to Elaine Freeman, Park Interpreter at Edisto Beach State Park, for her assistance in compiling this curriculum guide. Special thanks also to Lundie Spence at N.C. Sea Grant, Lisa Norman at Ashley Hall School, James Reed, Walter Rhett, Anne Moise at the S.C. State Ports Authority, and Virginia Roberson with the Colleton County School District, for their contributions.

NOAA   SC Sea Grant Consortium

For further information contact Elizabeth Joyner
elizabeth.joyner@scseagrant.org
or (843) 953-2078


Ports for High School
Lesson Plans

http://www.portseattle.org/portandyou/educ/02teach.htm
This site contains case studies for high school students relating to geography, social studies, writing and economics.

References
http://www.port-of-charleston.com
Check out this website for “fun facts” about the port, general statistics regarding the port, information about how cargo moves from ship to store, and general information about the port.

http://www.port-technology.com/projects/charleston
This is the website for the ports and sea terminals industry. This link discusses the expansion of the port in Charleston.

http://www.aapa-ports.org/education/index.html
This is the education page of the American Association of Ports Authorities.

http://www.seacoastnh.com/blackhistory/jacks.html
This is a site of questions and answers about African American seamen.

Field Trips
Georgetown Rice Museum   http://www.ricemuseum.com
The story of the rice culture in Georgetown County -- one of the most colorful chapters in the history of American agriculture -- has been captured at The Rice Museum. Through maps, dioramas, artifacts, and other exhibits, visitors to the Museum gain a knowledge and understanding of a society based on one crop.

South Carolina State Museum   http://www.museum.state.sc.us
The museum offers a field trip for 8th grade students that focuses on the importance of cotton in antebellum South Carolina. The museum also offers a cultural history of South Carolina tour for students in grades K-12.

Old Santee Canal Park   http://www.oldsanteecanalpark.org
Old Santee Canal Park offers field trips about the historical importance of the canal. The programs can be adjusted for both middle and high school students.

Coastal Discovery Museum   http://www.coastaldiscovery.org
The museum offers middle school programs that discuss the historical importance of ports in the region and of important export crops, such as rice.


Middle School

“Rise and Fall and Rise . . . South Carolina's Maritime History” is the lead article for Fall 2002. Create an inquiry lesson based on the article and following questions:

• What do you know about ports in general? What do you know about the port of Charleston? Have students locate the port of Charleston on a map of South Carolina.

• Have students use a map of ocean surface currents (http://www.acl.lanl.gov/GrandChal/GCM/currents.html) to trace the path a mariner would have taken in the 1700s in order to transport a product from Europe to the American colonies. Why did Charleston become a port city? How did greater precision in navigation and improved ocean vessels affect the port of Charleston?

Social Studies: 8.2.1, 8.8.5

• Divide the class into small cooperative learning groups. Have each group use the article to create a timeline of the Charleston port. Assign each group a significant point on the timeline, for example the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825, and have the group present its historical significance.

• How did the African American culture contribute to the success of the port of Charleston? Have each student, or small group of students, create and present a poster detailing the impact of the slaves on the maritime history and economy of Charleston.

Social Studies: 8.1.1, 8.2.1, 7.3.7

• Compare and contrast the maritime histories of the North and the South. Were coastal settlers in the North plantation owners? How did slaves contribute to the maritime culture of the South? Why is it important to have an established railway system associated with a port and why did Charlestonians reject the idea of a railroad system?

Social Studies: 8.3.6, 8.8.5, 8.8.2, 8.8.3, 8.2.1, 7.3.7

Language Arts Connection
Instruct each student to create a “day in the life” journal entry. The student should write in first person and may choose to be a “character” from any time period discussed in the article, e.g. a dock worker in the early 1900s, the owner of a rice plantation, a slave waterman, etc.

Vocabulary
Hinterland, infrastructure, hidebound, antebellum, stevedores

Acknowledgements
Special thanks to Elaine Freeman, Park Interpreter at Edisto Beach State Park, for her assistance in compiling this curriculum guide. Special thanks also to Lundie Spence at N.C. Sea Grant, Lisa Norman at Ashley Hall School, James Reed, Walter Rhett, Anne Moise at the S.C. State Ports Authority, and Virginia Roberson with the Colleton County School District, for their contributions.


NOAA   SC Sea Grant Consortium

For further information call (843) 953-2078


Ports for Middle School
Lesson Plans

http://www.apl.com/boomerangbox/index.htm
Have your students explore the world with the Boomerang Box! Since October 1997, the bright blue Boomerang Box has visited nearly every continent and traveled over 163,000 miles! Where is it going next?

http://www.portseattle.org/portandyou/educ/02teach.htm
This site contains case studies for middle school students relating to geography, social studies, writing and economics.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/resources/ngo/education/ideas58/58wearing.html
This lesson introduces the concept of global interdependence by exploring the origins of many of the goods that students wear and use every day.

http://ofcn.org/cyber.serv/academy/ace/soc/cecsst/cecsst131.html
These activities are designed to show the students that imported products literally "touch" the lifestyles and everyday activities of America's youth.

References
http://www.port-technology.com/projects/charleston
This is the website for the ports and sea terminals industry. This link discusses the expansion of the port in Charleston.

http://www.port-of-charleston.com
Check out this website for “fun facts” about the port, general statistics regarding the port, information about how cargo moves from ship to store, and general information about the port.

http://www.aapa-ports.org/education/index.html
This is the Education page of the American Association of Ports Authorities.

http://www.seacoastnh.com/blackhistory/jacks.html
This is a site of questions and answers about African American seamen.

Resources
Adopt-a-Ship Plan   http://www.marad.dot.gov/adopt_a_ship/brochu1.htm
The purpose of the Plan is to teach young America, the citizens of tomorrow, the need for an educated American Merchant Marine for domestic and foreign shipping. The Plan fosters interests in geography, history, transportation, foreign and domestic trade, science, math, and English.

Field Trips
South Carolina State Museum   http://www.museum.state.sc.us
The museum offers a field trip for 8th grade students that focuses on the importance of cotton in antebellum South Carolina. The museum also offers a cultural history of South Carolina tour for students in grades K-12.

Old Santee Canal Park   http://www.oldsanteecanalpark.org
Old Santee Canal Park offers field trips about the historical importance of the canal. The programs can be adjusted for both middle and high school students.

Coastal Discovery Museum   http://www.coastaldiscovery.org
The museum offers middle school programs that discuss the historical importance of ports in the region and of important export crops, such as rice.


Last updated: 3/18/2008 10:24:22 AM
Curriculum Connection – Fall 2002

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