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Curriculum Connection – Summer-Fall 2010
 
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Explore Curriculum Connection guides, which are written to accompany each issue of Coastal Heritage, a quarterly publication of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium.

Coastal Heritage, Summer/Fall 2010 issue: Celebrating 30 Years

The Lowcountry – Where History Lives
Get Started on Your Own Disaster Readiness
Is the Coast Prepared for Climate Change?
Challenges of Managing South Carolina's Shorelines
Linking Sprawl and Water Quality

The Lowcountry – Where History Lives
Focus Questions:
  • What were the societal and economic impacts of slavery during the pre- and post- Civil War eras?
  • Why is rice so popular in South Carolina? Are there other crops that were economically significant? Which ones?
  • How did the Gullah culture develop? What are the challenges to preserving this culture?
  • What factors contributed to the Jazz Age in Charleston?

Use the Curriculum Connection to Address South Carolina Standards!

Science
1-2.3  Classify plants according to their characteristics (including what specific type of environment they live in, whether they have edible parts, and what particular kinds of physical traits they have).

1-2.4 Summarize the life cycle of plants (including germination, growth, and the production of flowers and seeds).

5-3.4    Explain how waves, currents, tides, and storms affect the geologic features of the ocean shore zone (including beaches, barrier islands, estuaries, and inlets).

5-3.5    Compare the movement of water by waves, currents, and tides.

5-3.6    Explain how human activity (including conservation efforts and pollution) has affected the land and the oceans of Earth.

6-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of structures, processes, and
responses of plants that allow them to survive and reproduce. (Life Science)

B-3.1 Summarize the overall process by which photosynthesis converts solar energy into chemical energy and interpret the chemical equation for the process.

Social Studies
3-2.7 Explain the transfer of the institution of slavery into South Carolina from the West Indies, including the slave trade and the role of African Americans in the developing plantation economy; the daily lives of African American slaves and their contributions to South Carolina, such as the Gullah culture and the introduction of new foods; and the African American acts of resistance against white authority.

4-2.5 Summarize the introduction and establishment of slavery in the American colonies, including the role of the slave trade; the nature of the Middle Passage; and the types of goods—rice, indigo, sugar, tobacco, and rum, for example—that were exchanged among the West Indies, Europe, and the Americas.

8-1.4 Explain the growth of the African American population during the colonial period and the significance of African Americans in the developing culture (e.g., Gullah) and economy of South Carolina, including the origins of African American slaves, the growth of the slave trade, the impact of population imbalance between African and European Americans and the Stono Rebellion and subsequent laws to control the slave population.

English and Language Arts
81.6 Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, media productions, and the visual and performing arts).

81.7 Compare/contrast literary texts from various genres (for example, poetry, drama, novels, and short stories).

E11.6 Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, written works, oral and auditory presentations, discussions, media productions, and the visual and performing arts).

Lesson Links…
Build rice planters and grow rice at your school to connect science instruction with an important historical context to S.C. Visit www.kidsregen.org/howTo.php?section=inGarden&ID=4 to find information about the growing cycles of rice and the plant’s parts. Make observations about the growing cycles of the plant and see how many parts you can identify. Additional information is available at http://www.riceromp.com/teachers/lessonContent.cfm?pId=216. (1st – 5th)

Follow Lesson Link #1 and brainstorm biotic and abiotic factors that may affect the plant’s growth. Develop questions about if and how your plant will be affected by changing variables then make predictions. Design an experiment to test your predictions…be sure to include a control in your experimentation. Consider testing how changing the amount of sunlight, fresh and salt water, nutrients, etc. the plant receives affects the plants growth and health. Discuss your findings with the class. How do your findings compare to real examples in South Carolina? What happens to rice fields in times of drought, floods, and hurricanes? Why does rice need sunlight? (6th – 12th)

Do you know someone of Gullah or Geechee descent? The preservation of the stories, facts and reflections is crucial to understanding the past. Develop your skills at recording oral history by visiting www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/educational/yag/yaghow.html and be a key player in capturing this cultural gem for the future!  Storytelling in the Gullah culture is instrumental in passing oral histories from generation to generation. Gullah Net is a creative website designed to showcase stories, songs and other cultural icons. Check it out at: www.knowitall.org/gullahnet/gullah/storytelling/index.html  (3rd – 12th)

Learn more about the history of Charleston jazz by visiting http://www.charlestonjazz.net. This site hosts oral histories, photos, and current events preserving the jazz culture which originated in Charleston.  Learn more about the Jenkins Orphanage by visiting the official site: www.jenkinsinstitute.org. You can also access a video clip of their 1928 performance by clicking on the South Carolina State Parks video clip: www.sc.edu/csam/archive_video.html. (5th - 12th).

Additional Resources
In 1789, former slave, Olaudah Equiano, published his autobiography, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equinao, or Gustavus Vassa, the Africa, which describes life before, during, and after slavery. The complete autobiography can be downloaded from http://history.hanover.edu/texts/equiano/equiano_contents.html.

How is water chemistry affected in these rice fields?  What effect does this chemistry have on the local ecosystem? www.worldfishcenter.org/Pubs/CultureOfFish/section1.pdf

How are genes of Carolina Gold rice being used by scientists?  www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2005/050818.htm

Field Trip Opportunities!
Experience history throughout South Carolina by visiting the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor that runs from Wilmington, North Carolina, to Jacksonville, Florida. Learn more about the project and sites to visit at: http://www.nps.gov/guge/index.htm. (5th - 12th)

Middleton Place Plantation is a National Historic Landmark located in the Charleston area, providing educational programs and displays capturing Gullah history and culture. Learn more about the plantation and available programs and tours by visiting: http://www.middletonplace.org/.  (5th – 12th)

Drayton Hall is a National Trust Historic Landmark located in the Charleston area and provides several educational, standards-based programs including African-American history, History and Science, and Archaeology. Plan your trip by visiting: http://www.draytonhall.org/. (5th – 12th)

Visit the home of South Carolina jazz pioneer, Dizzy Gillespie, located in Cheraw, South Carolina: http://www.cheraw.com/dizzy_gillespie_cheraw.html. (9th - 12th)

The Avery Research Center, once a schoolhouse in downtown Charleston, provides exhibits and programs featuring Gullah and African American culture. Visit http://avery.cofc.edu/ to see which events are coming up! (9th – 12th)


Get Started on Your Own Disaster Readiness

Focus Questions:
  • Why was the Floyd evacuation a disaster? What would have happened if Floyd had made landfall and there was still a traffic jam on I-26?
  • What improvements have been made to evacuation plans since Hurricane Floyd?
  • How will I be affected should a hurricane strike my community?
  • How did Hurricane Hugo impact the coastal area? How did Hurricane Katrina affect coastal Louisiana?
  • What are examples of disaster resiliency?

Use the Curriculum Connection to Address South Carolina Standards!

Science
2nd Grade:
2-3.6  Identify safety precautions that one should take during severe weather conditions.

4th Grade: Weather
4-4.3  Summarize the conditions and effects of severe weather phenomena (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and related safety concerns.

5th Grade: Ecosystems: Terrestrial and Aquatic

5-2.3 Compare the characteristics of different ecosystems (including estuaries/salt marshes, oceans, lakes and ponds, forests, and grasslands).

6th Grade: Earth’s Atmosphere and Weather
6-4.1  Summarize the relationship of the movement of air masses, high and low pressure systems, and frontal boundaries to storms (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and other weather conditions.

8th Grade: Earth’s Structure and Processes
8-3.9    Identify and illustrate geologic features of South Carolina and other regions of the world through the use of imagery (including aerial photography and satellite imagery) and topographic maps.

9th – 12th: Earth’s Atmosphere
ES-4.8 Predict weather conditions and storms (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornados) on the basis of the relationship among the movement of air masses, high and low pressure systems, and frontal boundaries.

ES-4.6  Summarize possible causes of and evidence for past and present global climate changes.

ES-4.7 Summarize the evidence for the likely impact of human activities on the atmosphere (including ozone holes, greenhouse gases, acid rain, and photochemical smog).

Lesson Links…
Collaborate with your art teacher to have students explore the levels of destruction caused by different category hurricane events. Students work in groups to research and design a diorama to represent what their school and surrounding property would look like if struck by hurricanes of different categories. Check out NOAA’s National Hurricane Center for information on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Here you will find rating scale based on hurricane intensity. (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshs.shtml) (1st – 5th)

Visit FEMA’s Map Information Platform’s on-line mapping tool to create flood and hurricane maps of your area. Type your school or home address into the “Map Viewer” on the right to identify past floods and hurricanes that have historically affected it. Print maps to develop a plan for evacuating if a hurricane strikes your area. Be sure to consider the relief of the landscape, location of major roads and interstates, and location of streams and other bodies of water. https://hazards.fema.gov/femaportal/wps/portal/  (6th – 12th)

Visit the SEACOOS website for many lesson plans and resources on hurricanes at the “Take Your Students by Storm!” website http://www.seacoos.org/Community%20and%20Classroom/hurricane-classroom/. Here you will find lessons for tracking hurricanes, making weather instruments, modeling storm surges in coastal communities, and more. (6th – 12th)  

Would you order a mandatory evacuation? Direct students to the website http://weathereye.kgan.com/lounge/plans/hurricane.html. Students become the mayor of a Florida city just as a hurricane is forming and must decide whether or not to order a forced evacuation based on facts about the hurricane and the town. Relate this barrier island to barrier islands in South Carolina. (Note: Certain parts of the website are password protected. Before having your students work on this activity, visit the website and register your class with WeatherEye. These pages may be printed out if your class does not have access to the Internet. (6th – 12th)
 
Have students inspect maps of hurricane evacuation routes http://www.dot.state.sc.us/getting/evacuation.html. Have each student plan his/her family’s best evacuation route. Where is the nearest storm shelter? How would you protect your favorite belongings if you left them behind? (1st – 12th )

National Geographic Expeditions provides this lesson plan on hurricanes  www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/15/g68/seasstorms.html. (6th - 8th)

Check out your coastal elevation by visiting the NOAA Digital Coast site at: http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/. Which areas of South Carolina have natural buffers of protection (ie., wetlands and barrier islands)? What areas might be more prone to heavy damage during another hurricane?  (6th – 12th)

Additional Resources
What causes a hurricane? Visit the link for "How Hurricanes form." http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/hurricanes/index.html

Who makes hurricane forecasts? Visit the National Hurricane Center www.nhc.noaa.gov/

What did Hurricane Katrina look like on August 28, 2005, before it made landfall on the Gulf Coast? http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?2005240-0828/Katrina.A2005240.1700.2km.jpg

How much do I know about hurricanes? Take this NOVA ScienceNOW quiz on hurricanes. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/3204/02.html

How often do hurricanes strike the U.S.? To learn more about hurricanes, visit this site made by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Science, titled Hurricane Strike. http://meted.ucar.edu/hurrican/strike/

How do scientists research hurricanes?  Visit this USGS link to learn how scientists learn about and predict hurricanes. http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/hurricanes/

National Geographic provides this site on hurricanes: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/eye/hurricanes/hurricanes.html

Investigate this CNN online resource of Hurricane Katrina’s path as she made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River, in Louisiana. You will find images of New Orleans (LA), Gulfport (MS), Biloxi (MS), and Mobile (AL).
www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/hurricanes/interactive/fullpage.hurricanes/katrina.html

Flooding in New Orleans and vicinity brought to you from the Earth Observatory, a branch of NASA: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=17018

Images of levee breaks in New Orleans: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=13101

Compare satellite images before and after the hurricane at: http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2005/hurricanes/interactive/fullpage.nola.flood/katrina.maps.html


Visit the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Windows to the Universe www.windows.ucar.edu/cgi-bin/tour_def/teacher_resources/hurricane_climate/teach_hurricane_climate.html. This activity shows how climate and hurricanes are linked.

Is the Coast Prepared for Climate Change?

Focus Questions
  • What are the major impacts of rising seas?
  • What are some examples of the ways in which communities are planning to deal with sea-level rise?
  • What are some of the effects of rising temperatures as they pertain to the ocean? What are some of the major initiatives being explored to combat rising temperatures?
  • How does the amount of carbon dioxide affect ocean animals, specifically crustaceans, mollusks, and corals?

Use the Curriculum Connection to Address South Carolina Standards!

4th Grade: Weather
4-4.3   Summarize the conditions and effects of severe weather phenomena (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and related safety concerns.

5th Grade: Landforms and Oceans

5-3.4   Explain how waves, currents, tides, and storms affect the geologic features of the ocean shore zone (including beaches, barrier islands, estuaries, and inlets).

5-3.6   Explain how human activity (including conservation efforts and pollution) has affected the land and the oceans of Earth.

6th Grade: Structures, Processes, and Responses of Animals
6-3.1    Compare the characteristic structures of invertebrate animals (including sponges, segmented worms, echinoderms, mollusks, and arthropods) and vertebrate animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals).

7th Grade: Physical Science
7-5.3    Distinguish between acids and bases and use indicators (including litmus paper, pH paper, and phenolphthalein) to determine their relative pH.

8th Grade: Earth’s Systems and Processes
8-3.9: Identify and illustrate geologic features of South Carolina and other regions of the world through the use of imagery (including aerial photography and satellite imagery) and topographic maps.

9th – 12th: Biology
B-6.1    Explain how the interrelationships among organisms (including predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) generate stability within ecosystems.

B-6.6   Explain how human activities (including population growth, technology, and consumption of resources) affect the physical and chemical cycles and processes of Earth.

9th – 12th: Earth’s Atmosphere
ES-4.6 Summarize possible causes of and evidence for past and present global climate changes

ES-4.7   Summarize the evidence for the likely impact of human activities on the atmosphere (including ozone holes, greenhouse gases, acid rain, and photochemical smog).

ES-5.7   Explain the effects of the transfer of solar energy and geothermal energy on the oceans of Earth (including the circulation of ocean currents and chemosynthesis).

9th – 12th: Physics
P-10.4   Explain thermal expansion in solids, liquids, and gases in terms of kinetic theory and the unique behavior of water.

Lesson Links…
Carbon moves from one area of Earth to another – often taking millions of years to be released once absorbed. The amount of carbon on Earth does not change; however. The Carbon Cycle Game is an interactive web-based lesson that shows how carbon is released and absorbed. Go to www.windows.ucar.edu/earth/climate/carbon_cycle.html and travel around with carbon! (4th – 9th )

The melting of polar ice is one of the major contributors to sea-level rise. The CReSIS program provides information relevant to both researchers and educators on the state of ice sheets and potential impacts of their shrinking found at https://www.cresis.ku.edu/.  Located under the Educator section are a series of lessons, “Ice, Ice Baby,” suitable for grades K-8 and features the PolarTREC teacher blogs. Visit the site for posters, the book of the month, and more! (K-12th)   

Visit the SECOORA website, www.secoora.org, for hourly data on water temperature, air temperature, salinity, waves, currents, and more! The activity “Surge of the Storm” can be accessed from this site and shows the impact of storm surge to those coastal communities. With rising sea level, storm surge will become more of an issue of concern in the future. (6th-12th)

Increased temperatures are causing sea level to rise and are also causing the sea-surface temperatures to increase. Hurricanes are cause for concern along the U.S. East Coast and Gulf of Mexico, and communities will have greater impacts based on these two changes. “Check out the My NASA Data site for lesson plans related to sea-surface temperature changes and other climate change related topics. Go to http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/lessons.html and click on the tab that says “Climate Change Lessons” on the bottom menu.” (6th – 12th)

Students read topological maps of their neighborhood to predict the effect of sea-level rise due to global warming: http://umassk12.net/~global/index_files/TopoMap_LessonPlan.doc

Students extrapolate the effects of climate change to the effects of coastal areas around the world.  They identify places prone to flood around the globe and compare these places with the locations of night lights over the Earth: http://earth.rice.edu/activities/earthupdate/activities/EUactivities/activity05.html

Visit this website to access additional information on the local and regional consequences of climate change. This resource includes a curriculum guide of activities for teaching about climate change over temporal and spatial timescales, as well as its effect on ecosystems and disease:  http://www.climatehotmap.org/index.html

Visit the Exploratorium’s Global Climate Change-Research Explorer webpage to learn more about the interactions among the spheres in the Earth System affecting global climate change.  Here you can access graphs and charts (along with clear explanations), online glossary of terms, and up-to-date articles related to global climate change. This is your one-stop Global Climate Change shop! http://www.exploratorium.edu/climate/index.html

Do your students need more experience interpreting graphs? Have your students investigate climate changes by analyzing ice core data from Greenland and Antarctica dating back thousands of years. Students use information about natural and anthropogenic changes in the atmosphere to formulate predictions about the Earth's climate. http://tea.armadaproject.org/activity/leppik/gettingtothecoreofclimatechange_main.html

Investigating Climate Change over Time. NOAA’s Office of Paleoclimatology offers a look at climate change from past centuries through the past millennia. Scientists from around the world contribute to this study of past climate in hopes of achieving a better understanding of the Earth's present and future climate: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/globalwarming/home.html

Independent Research Projects. Need ideas for a summative assessment on climate change?  Visit the EPA’s web site on Climate Change.  The site is a comprehensive resource with accessible information covering climate change from many different perspectives and interests: http://epa.gov/climatechange/index.html

Additional Resources

Want to stay plugged in to what the scientists say? Check out the N.C./S.C. Sea Grant Extension Climate Blog at http://blogs.ncseagrant.org/coastalclimate/ and hear what local scientists are saying about climate change issues.

Visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center website for information on how local communities are addressing climate change issues like sea-level rise. Check out the projects, CANVIS and Digital Coast, to see how information is being used to predict the impacts of sea-level rise along our coast. Visit www.csc.noaa.gov for more information on training and resources.

Challenges of Managing South Carolina’s Shorelines
 
Focus Questions
  • Along coastal South Carolina, what are the issues caused by rising sea levels?
  • How has the approach to climate change shifted? Why?
  • What are some examples of the ways in which communities are adjusting to rising sea levels? Using one example, name the pros and cons to a particular approach.

Use the Curriculum Connection to Address South Carolina Standards!


4th Grade: Weather
4-4.3    Summarize the conditions and effects of severe weather phenomena (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and related safety concerns.

5th Grade: Ecosystems: Terrestrial and Aquatic
5-2.3    Compare the characteristics of different ecosystems (including estuaries/salt marshes, oceans, lakes and ponds, forests, and grasslands).

5th Grade: Landforms and Oceans
5-3.4    Explain how waves, currents, tides, and storms affect the geologic features of the ocean shore zone (including beaches, barrier islands, estuaries, and inlets).

5-3.6  Explain how human activity (including conservation efforts and pollution) has affected the land and the oceans of Earth.

9th – 12th: Biology
B-6.6    Explain how human activities (including population growth, technology, and consumption of resources) affect the physical and chemical cycles and processes of Earth.

9th – 12th: Earth’s Atmosphere

ES-4.7    Summarize the evidence for the likely impact of human activities on the atmosphere (including ozone holes, greenhouse gases, acid rain, and photochemical smog).

ES-5.7    Explain the effects of the transfer of solar energy and geothermal energy on the oceans of Earth (including the circulation of ocean currents and chemosynthesis).

9th – 12th: Physics
P-10.4    Explain thermal expansion in solids, liquids, and gases in terms of kinetic theory and the unique behavior of water.

Lesson Links…
Observe the results of melting glacial and sea ice for yourself! Check out the COSEE-SE activity “Causes and Effects of Our Rising Seas” found on www.cosee-se.org/files/teacher/SLR/Causes%20and%20Effects%20of%20Our%20Rising%20Seas-1.doc that demonstrates how the melting of land ice compares with the melting of sea ice. (6th -12th)     

Check the SECOORA website www.secoora.org for hourly data on water temperature, air temperature, salinity, waves, currents, and more! The activity “Surge of the Storm” can be accessed from this site and shows the impact of storm surge to those coastal communities. With rising sea level, storm surge will become more of an issue of concern in the future. (6th-12th)

Increased temperatures are causing sea level to rise and are also causing the sea surface temperatures to increase. Hurricanes are cause for concern along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico communities and will have greater impacts based on these two changes. Check out http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov to access inquiry-based activities such as “Hurricanes as Heat Engines.” (6th – 12th)

Salt marsh retreat and drowning are common ecological responses to rising sea levels. Explore the impact on sea-level rise with this activity from the University of Rhode Island: http://omp.gso.uri.edu/ompweb/doee/teacher/pdf/act22.pdf 

Additional Resources

Linking Sprawl and Water Quality
 
Focus Questions:
  • What is stormwater run-off and why can this be harmful to the environment?
  • What are two examples of Low Impact Development communities in South Carolina? What aspects do those communities have to make it “low-impact”?

Use the Curriculum Connection to Address South Carolina Standards!

7th Grade: Ecology: The Biotic and Abiotic Environment
7-4.5    Summarize how the location and movement of water on Earth’s surface through groundwater zones and surface-water drainage basins, called watersheds, are important to ecosystems and to human activities.

9th – 12th grade: Biology
B-6.6 Explain how human activities (including population growth, technology, and consumption of resources) affect the physical and chemical cycles and processes of Earth.

Lesson Links…

South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV) developed two interactive and educational virtual tours that guide you down watershed systems in South Carolina. Go to http://www.riverventure.org and begin your tour by clicking on the “Three Rivers” link, which will take a historical look at development along rivers in Columbia. Continue your journey toward the sea as you click on “The Estuary” virtual tour. You will travel the last part of the Cooper River in Charleston, ending at the terminal point of the watershed: the Atlantic Ocean! (6th – 12th)

Curious about where your watershed begins and where it eventually flows? Find out your location by using Google Earth. It’s an exciting way to learn about the watersheds in your area and understand how your location ties in with areas upstream and downstream from you! Click on http://earth.google.com and click on the green download button to explore your watershed. Or go to http://www.epa.gov/teachers/water.htm and click on the “Locate Your Watershed” link to explore your watershed and learn about local efforts in your area. (6th-12th)

Stormwater runoff naturally occurs each time it rains – what the ground cannot absorb quickly enough ends up “running off” to another location. Stormwater has become a topic for concern because of the pollutants that often contaminate the runoff and end up in our water sources. The Educator’s Toolbox found at http://www.epa.gov/teachers/water.htm offers several creative lesson plans focusing on the problems with stormwater runoff and what you can do about it! (9th-12th)

Development can work in harmony with the environment by employing sustainable or “green” building practices. The Educator Toolbox found at
http://www.stormwatercoalition.org/html/et/index.html provides an opportunity for students to investigate options for “green infrastructure.” (9th-12th)

Home or School Energy Audit, Alliance to Save Energy. This activity turns students into building inspectors as they identify the structures that help or inhibit energy efficiency.  http://www.ase.org/uploaded_files/educatorlessonplans/audit.pdf

Energy: The U.S. in Crisis, American Association for the Advancement of Science.  This lesson plan provides a model lesson exploring the energy crisis in the United States.  Students research and assess past, present, and future decisions related to energy shortages: http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.cfm?BenchmarkID=8&DocID=28

Solar Oven, GK-12 Program at the University of South Carolina.  This activity explores heat transfer to “cook” nachos.  The solar oven uses the sun to serve as a conventional electric oven: http://cece.engr.sc.edu/GK-12-Track1/institute03/Solar_Oven.doc

Green Building Professional Connections, U.S. Green Building Council.  Contact a professional in your area to schedule a presentation to your students about the importance of Green Building: http://www.usgbc.org/Chapters/ViewAll.aspx?CMSPageID=190&CategoryID=24&

Additional Resources
Go to South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control to obtain copies of their FREE publications regarding watersheds, water quality, and a variety of other topics! www.scdhec.gov

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources offers information through their Coastal Training Program regarding green building practices. Visit their website to learn about efforts you can do. www.dnr.sc.gov/marine/NERR/traininggreenhomes.html

Field Trips!


The Noisette Company of North Charleston is working to revitalize the old Navy Yard using green building practices. Visit Riverfront Park, which overlooks marshes surrounding Noisette Creek and the Cooper River. Learn more about the project by visiting www.noisettesc.com

The Edisto Interpretive Center at Edisto Beach State Park is a great local example of a “green building.” Pervious pavement, native plants, sustainable building products, and a variety of other green building practices were incorporated in the construction of this building. Learn more about the park by visiting www.scprt.com or take a look at the South Carolina Wildlife TV Show segment featuring the building at www.dnr.sc.gov/video/misc_tv/videoEdisto.html


Last updated: 10/11/2010 10:52:53 AM
Curriculum Connection – Summer-Fall 2010

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