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2010 Archived News Releases
 
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Media contact: Susan Ferris Hill, 843.953.2078                 

2010 S.C. Environmental Awareness Award Call for Nominations
Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org, (843) 953-2092

Charleston, S.C.— The state of South Carolina is seeking nominations for an award to recognize individuals who are doing extraordinary work for the natural environment. Nominations will be accepted through December 31, 2010.

The S.C. General Assembly established the S.C. Environmental Awareness Award, now in its 18th year, during the 1992 legislative session to recognize outstanding contributions made toward the protection, conservation and improvement of South Carolina’s natural resources.

Each year the public is invited to submit nominations that are then reviewed by an awards committee, which includes representatives from the state’s natural resource agencies.  In judging nominees, the committee considers excellence in innovation, leadership and accomplishments that influence positive changes affecting the natural environment.

Members of the awards committee represent the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, S.C. Forestry Commission, S.C. Department of Natural Resources and S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Dr. Fred Holland of Charleston, former director of the Hollings Marine Laboratory, won the 2009 S.C. Environmental Awareness Award. Dr. Holland was recognized for his exceptional contributions to ecological research and his lifelong dedication to the state’s coastal environment. A list of previous award winners, nomination guidelines and nomination form are available at www.scseagrant.org/Content/?cid=8 or by calling Susan Ferris Hill at (843) 953-2092.


S.C. Sea Grant Board of Directors Meeting Scheduled

(Release date September 13, 2010)
Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C.—S.C. Sea Grant Consortium Board of Directors will hold its annual meeting from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on September 21, 2010 at the College of Charleston, President’s Conference Room, 2nd Floor of Randolph Hall, 66 George Street, Charleston, S.C. Items on the agenda include the FY2011-12 state budget request and NOAA/Sea Grant FY2011 appropriations, reporting on Sea Grant core funding and extramural grants, review of agency performance measures and reports on state and regional coastal ocean initiatives. Election of the next Consortium Board Chair will also be held.

The Consortium’s Board of Directors is composed of the chief executive officers of its eight member institutions. Current board members are: Dr. Raymond S. Greenberg, president of Medical University of South Carolina; James F. Barker, president of Clemson University; Dr. David A. DeCenzo, president of Coastal Carolina University; Dr. P. George Benson, president of College of Charleston; John E. Frampton, executive director of S.C. Department of Natural Resources; Dr. George E. Cooper, president of S.C. State University; Lt. General John W. Rosa, president of The Citadel; and Dr. Harris Pastides, president of University of South Carolina.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, a university-based state agency, seeks to enhance the practical use and conservation of South Carolina’s coastal and marine resources that foster a sustainable economy and environment. The Consortium is a member of the nationwide network of 30 Sea Grant Programs that are sanctioned through the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce. For more information about the Consortium, visit www.scseagrant.org.


22nd Annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep Set for Sept. 18

(Release date September 7, 2010)
Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2092 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C.— The 22nd annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep is scheduled for Saturday, September 18 from 9 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Each year thousands of people participate in the Sweep, South Carolina’s largest one-day litter cleanup of beaches, marshes and waterways.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and S.C. Department of Natural Resources organize the statewide event, which is held in conjunction with the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. Anyone can participate – individuals, families, schools, youth groups, civic and conservation clubs or businesses. All necessary supplies are provided.

Last year over 4,500 dedicated volunteers removed 45.5 tons of debris. In its 21-year history, 1,055.5 tons of litter have been collected and recycled when possible.

There are many locations that still need volunteers. For a list of coastal site captains and cleanup locations, visit www.scseagrant.org or contact Susan Ferris Hill at (843) 953-2092. For a list of site captains and cleanup locations inland, visit www.dnr.sc.gov/bsrs or contact Bill Marshall at (803) 734-9096.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium seeks to enhance the practical use and conservation of South Carolina’s coastal and marine resources that foster a sustainable economy and environment. The Consortium, celebrating 30 years of science serving South Carolina’s coast, is a member of the nationwide network of 32 Sea Grant Programs that are sanctioned through the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce. For more information about the Consortium, visit www.scseagrant.org.


Horseshoe Crab Tagging to Assess Survival of Animals Used in Medical Research

(Release date July 6, 2010)
Contact: Larry DeLancey, S.C. Dept. of Natural Resources, (843) 953-9099, DeLanceyL@dnr.sc.gov
Susan Ferris Hill, S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, (843) 953-2092, susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Survival of horseshoe crabs after being bled for medical research and then released back into coastal waters is the focus of a two-year tagging study by the S. C. Department of Natural Resources and funded by the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. The tags are supplied by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

To date 1,600 crabs have been tagged and released, and the public is urged to report tagged crabs through the toll free number printed on the white button tag attached to the shell.

For years these primitive animals have been captured on state beaches and transported to medical research facilities where a portion of their unique blue blood is extracted and used to make Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate, which is widely used to test for bacterial endotoxin contamination in human intravenous drugs and medical devices.

“We hope that tag reports over several years will demonstrate if biomedical bleeding is having a detrimental effect on horseshoe crab populations,” said DNR biologist Larry DeLancey, who added that these animals are thought to be increasing in the Southeast.

About 100,000 horseshoe crabs are captured annually by licensed fishermen and taken to research facilities. Long term survival rates of the crabs released after being bled is not known.

Not actually crabs but more closely related to spiders, these harmless animals spawn on state beaches every spring and their eggs are a vital food source for migrating shorebirds, many species of which have declined in recent years.

A recently completed study of 100 bled and tagged horseshoe crabs held in a pond at SCDNR’s Waddell Mariculture Center in Bluffton had a survival rate of almost 90 percent, DeLancey said, noting the survival rate of crabs released into the wild might be different.

A separate study is assessing the economic impact of the horseshoe crab fishery on local commercial fishermen.

Horseshoe crabs are protected by South Carolina law and the crabs, as well as their shell, cannot be taken unless by permit.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium seeks to enhance the practical use and conservation of South Carolina’s coastal and marine resources that foster a sustainable economy and environment. The Consortium, celebrating 30 years of science serving South Carolina’s coast, is a member of the nationwide network of 32 Sea Grant Programs that are sanctioned through the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce. For more information about the Consortium, visit www.scseagrant.org.


Interagency Project Identifies Priority Coastal Research Needs for the Southeastern U.S.

(Release date May 19, 2010)
Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, (843) 953-2092, susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org or Christine Laporte, (706) 542-1280, claporte@uga.edu

The South Atlantic Regional Research Project (SARRP) recently released a plan identifying critical research needed to protect the health of coastal ecosystems and the economies that depend upon them in the southeastern United States. Funded by the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, SARRP’s regional scope extends from Currituck Bay, near North Carolina’s border with Virginia, to the southern tip of Florida.

The report acknowledges that currently the southeastern coastal waters are healthier than most other coastal regions along the mainland U.S., but human population growth, increased urbanization, conflicting uses of coastal and ocean resources, offshore energy and resource development and the hazards associated with hurricanes and climate change pose threats to the environmental and economic health of the region.

SARRP was managed by the Sea Grant programs in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, and was coordinated by the Georgia Coastal Research Council. The plan is intended for use by all the agencies and stakeholders in the region. In addition to prioritizing research issues, the project report encourages increased regional research and cooperation among state and federal agencies, as well as with colleges and universities.

The categories of SARRP research priorities mirror the four priority issue areas identified by the South Atlantic Alliance. Organized by the Governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, the Alliance is a partnership to develop and apply regional approaches to coastal and ocean issues of significance in the southeastern U.S.

“The southeastern United States is fortunate to have an abundance of coastal and ocean resources that attract new residents, visitors and commercial and business interests to our region,” said Rick DeVoe, executive director of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. “The regional research plan recognizes the pressures that this growth has and will have on these resources, and outlines detailed research needs that will have to be addressed to ensure that resource-related decision makers are informed by the best available scientific information.”

Among its 27 recommendations, the SARRP report describes the need for studies that assess the impacts that projected changes in sea level and temperature could have on fisheries and other marine species, and to determine the amount of freshwater flow that is required to ensure the health of estuaries and fisheries. The effects of population growth on sensitive coastal habitats also should be studied. The report also recommends that researchers examine the impacts of offshore energy development in light of renewed interest and the lifting of the moratorium on energy exploration along the Atlantic seaboard.

To access the full research plan, visit www.gcrc.uga.edu/SARRP/Documents/SARRP_ResearchPlan_2010.pdf. Printed copies of the report are available through each state Sea Grant program.

For more information about the National Sea Grant College Program, visit www.seagrant.noaa.gov. Links to the four Sea Grant programs in the South Atlantic states can be accessed from this website.

To learn more about the South Atlantic Alliance, visit www.southatlanticalliance.org.


Fred Holland named 2009 Environmental Awareness Award winner

(Release date March 31, 2010)
Contact: Thom Berry, (803) 898-3885, berrytw@dhec.sc.gov


Columbia, S.C. - Fred Holland of Charleston has been named winner of the 2009 South Carolina Environmental Awareness Award at an award ceremony held in Columbia today.
Dr. Fred Holland receives 2009 Environmental Awareness Award

Holland was recognized by Scott English, Governor Mark Sanford's Chief of Staff, for his outstanding contributions to estuarine and coastal ecology research as well as his lifelong dedication to the state’s coastal environment.

“Fred Holland is not just a steward of natural resources in South Carolina, he is a pioneer and in some cases, a national trend-setter for protecting and preserving our coastal resources,” English said in making the presentation.

Holland, a native South Carolinian, became director of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ Marine Resources Research Institute at Fort Johnson in Charleston in 1991. In 2001, Holland was named director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hollings Marine Laboratory until his retirement in 2008.

“Fred’s legacy is important for two reasons,” English said. “He has been able to translate in-depth scientific research for policymakers and the average person in making decisions that affect our communities. At the same time, he has mentored a new generation of marine scientists who will carry on his work in marine sciences.”

The S.C. General Assembly established the S.C. Environmental Awareness Award in 1992 to recognize outstanding contributions toward the protection, conservation and improvement of South Carolina's natural resources.

The award is sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, and the S.C. Forestry Commission.

Previous award winners are:


2008 - Benjamin T. (Ben) Zeigler, Pee Dee Land Trust, Florence
2007 - Dr. Richard Porcher, Jr., professor emeritus, The Citadel
2006 - Rick Huffman, Jr., founder, S.C. Native Plant Society, Pickens
2004 - John L. Knott, Jr., president, Noisette Company, North Charleston
2003 - Burris Family, Cypress Bay Plantation Tree Farm, Beaufort
2002 - Dr. Jack Turner, director, Watershed Ecology Center, University of South Carolina
2001 - James D. Elliott, Jr., founder, South Carolina Center for Birds of Prey
2000 - Dr. Dave Hargett, conservationist, Greenville
1999 - Kenneth Strickland, environmentalist, Florence
1998 - Yancey A. McLeod, Jr., environmental educator, Eastover
1996 - Beaufort County Clean Water Task Force
1995 - Dr. Whitfield Gibbons, senior research ecologist, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory
1993 - Dana Beach, S.C. Coastal Conservation League
1992 - Rudy Mancke, S.C. Educational Television


S.C. Graduate Students Selected for Marine Policy Fellowships

(Release date March 12, 2010)
Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C.— Charles Kolo Rathburn, Michelle Johnston and Lisa Vandiver have been chosen to receive Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships for 2010. Nominated by the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the students were among 46 selected from a nationwide pool of more than 90 candidates submitted by the nation’s Sea Grant College Programs. Selection criteria include academic performance, letters of recommendation, career interests and work and volunteer experience.

Charles Kolo Rathburn recently completed a M.S. in marine biology from the College of Charleston. He will serve as fellow in the office of Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi, helping to provide scientific information for marine-policy decisions.

Michelle Johnston is pursuing a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences at the University of South Carolina. She will serve as special assistant to the deputy director in the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

Lisa Vandiver is also pursuing a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences at the University of South Carolina. She will serve in the Damage, Assessment, Remediation and Restoration Program of the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service.

Each of the nation’s 32 Sea Grant programs can nominate up to six individuals for the Knauss Fellowship. “I am very pleased three graduate students from South Carolina were selected for this year’s class,” said Rick DeVoe, executive director of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. “The Knauss Fellowship experience will greatly benefit Charles, Michelle and Lisa as they move forward with their professional careers.”

To further the education of tomorrow’s leaders, the National Sea Grant Office has sponsored the Knauss Fellowship program since 1979. The fellowship brings a select group of graduate students to the nation’s capital where they learn about federal policy regarding marine and Great Lakes natural resources, and lend their scientific and policy expertise to federal agencies and congressional staff offices.

“Once again, S.C. Sea Grant has recommended outstanding fellowship candidates, three of whom have been selected in a highly competitive process to spend a year in Washington, D.C. working with marine policy in the legislative and executive branches,” said Miguel Lugo, Sea Grant Knauss Fellows program manager.

The fellowship is named after Dr. John A. Knauss, one of Sea Grant’s founders, former NOAA administrator and former Dean of the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium seeks to enhance the practical use and conservation of South Carolina’s coastal and marine resources that foster a sustainable economy and environment. The Consortium, celebrating 30 years of science serving South Carolina’s coast, is a member of the nationwide network of 32 Sea Grant Programs that are sanctioned through the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce. For more information about the Consortium, visit www.scseagrant.org.


Last updated: 1/12/2017 4:19:23 PM
2010 Archived News Releases

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