ContactSite MapSearchNews
Inside Sea GrantResearchExtensionEducationFundingProductsEvents

SC Sea Grant Consortium
287 Meeting Street
Charleston, SC 29401
p: 843.953.2078
f: 843.953.2080
2016 Archived News Releases
 

Current News Releases

archives: 2016  2015  2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008  2007


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 16, 2016

RE: Bluffton Water Quality Effort to be Featured at 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration in Charleston
Contact:
Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C. – A Bluffton, S.C. water quality improvement effort will be featured Saturday, November 19 during the 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration (ICSR’16) at the Hyatt Place Charleston Historic District in Charleston, S.C. The conference is organized by the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and runs November 16-19. Researchers, resource managers, businesses, shellfish farmers and community restoration practitioners worldwide will exchange information necessary to help restore molluscan shellfish populations, enhance the health of coastal ecosystems and improve water quality for shellfish survival, growth and harvest.

The overall theme for ISCR’16 is “Celebrating and Inspiring Healthy Coastal Communities,” with case studies and presentations scheduled by individuals and groups from nearly 20 states and nine countries. Kim Jones, watershed management division manager for the town of Bluffton, is Saturday’s keynote speaker. She plans to discuss the May River Watershed Action Plan, which grew out of the first closure of a section of May River oyster beds in 2009.

The shellfish industry long has been a critical component of the economy and culture of Bluffton. The 2009 closure prompted community leaders to come up with the 126-page May River Watershed Action Plan, which recommends strategies ranging from better disposal of pet waste to more use of pervious surface that soaks up water rather than hard surfaces for driveways and sidewalks.
 
Jones said she plans to talk about the process of bringing the community together to create the plan, and the successes and challenges along the way. The May River shellfish beds have been re-opened and closed several times since the plan was created in 2011. The plan is now in the phase of accessing the effectiveness of steps taken to this point, Jones said.

The Bluffton effort is one of several featured at the conference. A growing number of community groups and private enterprises have taken the lead in habitat restoration, resulting in more abundant shellfish populations and healthier ecosystems and communities.

Other sessions will address challenges and opportunities related to volunteer engagement, climate change, coastal development, shellfish diseases, shoreline stabilization, and resource management, policy and regulation.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 15, 2016

RE: 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration, Nov. 16-19 in Charleston, S.C.
Contact
: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C. – Did you know Friday is International Oyster Day? To celebrate research and restoration of oysters and other shellfish, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium is hosting the 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration Wednesday through Saturday in Charleston, S.C.

The theme is “Celebrating and Inspiring Healthy Coastal Communities.” Individuals, businesses and groups from nearly 20 states and nine countries will make presentations.

Sessions will address volunteer engagement, climate change, coastal development, shellfish diseases, shoreline stabilization, and resource management, policy and regulation.

Visit www.scseagrant.org/icsr to learn more.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 2, 2016

RE: 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration to be Held November 16-19 in Charleston, S.C.

Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C. – The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium will host the 18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration (ICSR’16) November 16-19, 2016 at the Hyatt Place Charleston Historic District in Charleston, S.C. The conference provides an opportunity for researchers, resource managers, shellfish farmers and community restoration practitioners worldwide to exchange information necessary to help restore molluscan shellfish populations, enhance the health of coastal ecosystems and improve water quality for shellfish survival, growth and harvest.

The overall theme for ISCR’16 is “Celebrating and Inspiring Healthy Coastal Communities,” with case studies and presentations scheduled by individuals and groups from nearly 20 states and nine countries. Supporting the theme, several of the sessions will deal with community efforts and volunteer engagement in restoring shellfish habitat. A growing number of community groups and private enterprises have taken the lead in habitat restoration, resulting in more abundant shellfish populations and healthier ecosystems and communities.

Other sessions will address challenges and opportunities related to climate change, coastal development, shellfish diseases, shoreline stabilization, and resource management, policy and regulation.

The keynote speaker on Thursday, November 17 is Tristan Hugh-Jones, owner of Atlantic Shellfish Ltd., in County Cork, Ireland. On Friday, November 18, the keynote speaker is Tom Ysebaert, Ph.D., senior researcher at Wageningen University and Research and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Wageningen, The Netherlands. Kim Jones, watershed management division manager for the town of Bluffton, S.C., is the keynote speaker Saturday, November 19.

To view the conference schedule, visit www.scseagrant.org/icsr.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 19, 2016

RE: Thousands Turn Out for 28th Annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep Litter Cleanup

Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org
               Bill Marshall, (803) 734-9096 or marshallb@dnr.sc.gov

Charleston, S.C.— Over 3,300 coastal volunteers participated in the 28th annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep litter cleanup on Saturday, September 17, covering 86 sites from Myrtle Beach to Daufuskie Island. A few cleanups are scheduled for September 24, which would raise the estimated number of coastal volunteers to over 3,700 at 96 sites. Approximately 1,000 volunteers participated inland at 27 sites across the rest of the state.

S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and S.C. Department of Natural Resources organize Beach Sweep/River Sweep, South Carolina’s largest, volunteer-driven litter cleanup of beaches, marshes and waterways. “The success of Beach Sweep/River Sweep is largely due to our extremely dedicated site captains and volunteers, who spend their time on a Saturday morning doing something good for their communities,” said Susan Ferris Hill, coastal coordinator with the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium.

Last year over 4,500 volunteers removed nearly 32 tons of litter from the state’s beaches, marshes and waterways. In the cleanup’s 27-year history, 1,209 tons of litter have been collected, and much of it was recycled.

Photos from Saturday’s cleanup are posted on the Beach Sweep/River Sweep Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BeachSweepRiverSweep. Coastal results and photos will be posted on the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium website at www.scseagrant.org/Content/?cid=49. Inland results and photos will be posted on the S.C. Department of Natural Resources website at www.dnr.sc.gov/bsrs. The 2017 cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, September 16.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 19, 2016

RE: S.C. Sea Grant Board of Directors Meeting Scheduled

Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Charleston, S.C.—S.C. Sea Grant Consortium Board of Directors will hold its annual meeting from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on September 28, 2016 in the 3rd floor conference room at the S.C. Department of Natural Resources’ Marine Resources Division administration building, 217 Ft. Johnson Road, Charleston, S.C. Items on the agenda include discussion of the agency’s FY2017-2018 state budget request; revision to the Consortium’s Strategic Plan; the Consortium’s visioning exercise; an update on the agency’s program performance, impacts and accomplishments; and reports on new agency studies and initiatives. Election of the next Consortium Board Chair will also be held.

The Consortium’s Board of Directors is composed of the chief executive officers of its eight member institutions. Current board members are: Col. Alvin A. Taylor, director of S.C. Department of Natural Resources (Board Chair); Dr. David A. DeCenzo, president of Coastal Carolina University; Dr. James P. Clements, president of Clemson University; Mr. Glenn F. McConnell, president of College of Charleston; Dr. David J. Cole, president of Medical University of South Carolina; Mr. James E. Clark, president of S.C. State University; Lt. General John W. Rosa, president of The Citadel; and Dr. Harris Pastides, president of University of South Carolina.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
September 1, 2016

RE: 28th Annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep Scheduled for Sept. 17, Volunteers Needed for Litter Cleanup

Contact: Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org
               Bill Marshall, (803) 734-9096 or marshallb@dnr.sc.gov

Charleston, S.C.— The 28th annual Beach Sweep/River Sweep is scheduled for Saturday, September 17 from 9 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Each year thousands of people volunteer for the Sweep, South Carolina’s largest one-day litter cleanup of beaches, marshes and waterways.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium is partnering with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources to organize the statewide event, which is held in conjunction with the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. Anyone can participate – individuals, families, schools, youth groups, civic and conservation clubs and businesses. Volunteers either organize their own cleanups at sites that are not already covered or they may sign up to assist at the cleanup locations listed on the websites below.

Last year over 4,500 dedicated volunteers removed nearly 32 tons of litter from the state’s beaches, marshes and waterways. In the cleanup’s 27-year history, 1,209 tons of litter have been collected, and much of it was recycled.

To participate in coastal counties, visit www.scseagrant.org/content/?cid=49 or contact Susan Ferris Hill at (843) 953-2092 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org. To participate in inland counties, visit www.dnr.sc.gov/bsrs or contact Bill Marshall at (803) 734-9096 or marshallb@dnr.sc.gov


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 26, 2016

RE: Drop off Unwanted Boating and Fishing Gear during Clean Marine May 12-14
Contact:
Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org
               EV Bell, (843) 953-2085 or ev.bell@scseagrant.org
     
Charleston, S.C.— What do a busted trailer tire, a dead boat battery and an unseaworthy boat have in common? They are all items that should be disposed of properly to keep our waterways healthy and safe.

The Clean Marine Disposal Event is set for May 12-14 at boat landings, marinas and marine-related businesses. People can bring most marine-related debris to the drop-off locations, including batteries, buoys, coolers, crab traps, cushions, motors and monofilament fishing line. Items that will not be accepted include firearms, flares, gas, propane and commercial grade hazardous household waste.
   
Volunteers will be at the following drop-off sites from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. May 12-14:

    • The Palmetto Store, 10086 N. Highway 17, McClellanville
    • Sewee Outpost, 4853 N. Highway 17, Awendaw
    • Charleston Boat Emporium, 2686 Highway 41, Mount Pleasant
    • Charleston City Marina, 17 Lockwood Drive, Charleston
    • Wappoo Cut Landing, Folly Road at Wappoo Cut bridge, Charleston
    • Folly Landing, Center Street at Folly River bridge, Folly Beach
    • W.O. Thomas Landing, Bridge View Drive at Ashley River, North Charleston
    • Charleston Sail and Power Squadron, 1376 Orange Grove Road, Charleston
    • The Edistonian General Store, 406 Highway 174, Edisto Island

The event also offers the opportunity to get rid of old boats and trailers that might have been sitting unused in garages or yards for years. Charleston County residents who can haul boats and trailers to the Bees Ferry Landfill won’t have to pay the tipping fee usually required for those large items during the event. Boats and trailers will be accepted for free disposal between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. May 12-13 and 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. on May 14 at 1344 Bees Ferry Road, Charleston.

“The Clean Marine Disposal Event is a unique stewardship effort that helps prevent marine debris,” said E.V. Bell, marine education specialist at the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. “By having the public drop off their unwanted items, we reduce the risk that these things might end up in our coastal waterways. This will, in turn, help to protect our wildlife and habitats.”

Last year, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, using grant funds from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Debris Program, removed nearly 78 tons of debris from waterways, garages and storage units in the Charleston area. A targeted derelict vessel removal effort plucked 10 abandoned vessels weighing about 68 tons from local waterways last summer. Another 9.8 tons of smaller debris such as boat batteries, fishing gear and marine paints and solvents were dropped off in a weekend Clean Marine Disposal Event at local boat landings.

With grant funds from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and SCDHEC’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management partner with Charleston County, Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission, the City of Charleston, the City Marina and many community organizations to get the work done. For more information, go to www.scseagrant.org/cleanmarine.



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE          
March 17, 2016              

RE: Statewide 2015 Environmental Awareness Award Nominations Due May 12
Contact:
Greg Lucas, (864) 380-5201 or lucasg@dnr.sc.gov

Columbia, S.C.—The state of South Carolina is seeking nominations for an award to recognize individuals who are doing extraordinary work for the natural environment. Nominations will be accepted through May 12.

The S.C. Environmental Awareness Award, now in its 22nd year, was established by S.C. General Assembly during the 1992 legislative session to recognize outstanding contributions made toward the protection, conservation and improvement of South Carolina’s natural resources. Nomination guidelines and application forms are available by e-mailing or calling Stacie Crowe, crowes@dnr.sc.gov or (843) 953-9092.

Each year the public is invited to submit nominations that are then reviewed by an awards committee. In judging nominees, the committee considers excellence in innovation, leadership and accomplishments that influence positive changes affecting the natural environment.

Members of the awards committee represent the S.C. Forestry Commission, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, S.C. Department of Natural Resources and S.C. Sea Grant Consortium.

The 2014 Environmental Awareness Award winner, George W. McDaniel, Ph.D., was honored for his impressive body of work merging environmental conservation and historic preservation, which spans many decades. He was the director of Drayton Hall Plantation in Charleston.

Previous winners of the Environmental Awareness Award include:

2014 – George W. McDaniel, Ph.D., Director of Drayton Hall Plantation
2013 – Joseph R. Hamilton, Founder of the Quality Deer Management Association
2012 – Thomas Kester, Chairman and Treasurer for the Conestee Foundation
2011 – Dr. Patricia J. DeCoursey, Professor of Biological Sciences at USC
2010 – Frank S. Holleman III, President, Naturaland Trust
2009 – Dr. Fred Holland, Coastal Ecologist, Charleston
2008 – Benjamin Ziegler, Chairman, Pee Dee Land Trust
2007 – Dr. Richard Porcher Jr., Professor Emeritus, The Citadel
2006 – Rick Huffman, Founder, South Carolina Native Plant Society
2004 – John L. Knott Jr., President, Noisette Company, North Charleston
2003 – Burris Family, Owners, Cypress Bay Plantation Tree Farm, Beaufort
2002 – Dr. Jack Turner, Director, Watershed Ecology Center, USC
2001 – James D. Elliott, Jr., Founder, South Carolina Center for Birds of Prey
2000 – Dr. Dave Hargett, Conservationist, Greenville
1999 – Kenneth Strickland, Environmentalist, Florence
1998 – Yancey A. McLeod Jr., Environmental Educator, Eastover
1997 – Brad Wyche, President, Friends of the Reedy River, Greenville
1996 – Beaufort County Clean Water Task Force
1995 – Dr. Whitfield Gibbons, Senior Research Ecologist, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory
1994 – Marion Burnside, Chairman, S.C. Department of Natural Resources
1993 – Dana Beach, Executive Director, S.C. Coastal Conservation League
1992 – Rudy Mancke, Naturalist, S.C. Educational Television



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 8, 2016

RE: Coastal Flood Resiliency to be Bolstered by NOAA award to S.C. Sea Grant
Contact: Rick DeVoe, (843) 953-2078 or rick.devoe@scseagrant.org
               Liz Fly, Ph.D., (843) 609-5309 or elizabeth.fly@scseagrant.org
               Norman Levine, Ph.D., (843) 953-5308 or LevineN@cofc.edu

Charleston, S.C.— A grant awarded to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium (Consortium) on behalf of the Charleston Resilience Network (CRN) will help community leaders plan for and adapt to the area’s increasing flood challenges.

The $510,319 Regional Coastal Resilience Grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to the Consortium “will support the development of more robust and localized flooding models that can be used to plan infrastructure improvements in the Charleston, S.C. region,” according to Rick DeVoe, executive director of the Consortium and program manager of the award. Researchers from College of Charleston, University of South Carolina and The Citadel will partner with the CRN and the Consortium on the three-year project. The non-federal match of $255,569 brings the total grant award to $765,887.

The mapping will focus down to the individual parcel level to examine the ability of the fast-growing, low-lying community to absorb flood impacts and build resiliency to flooding. This is important as people flock to the area as the Charleston economy builds on its expanding tourism, research, technology and manufacturing sectors.

The flood maps will factor in new data on storm drains and sewer lines, the impacts of severe high tides and heavy bursts of rain and on how the topography influences the movement of water, according to Norman Levine, Ph.D., who will lead the mapping effort. “That type of mapping doesn’t exist at all now,” said Levine, an associate professor in the Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences at the College of Charleston and director of the Lowcountry Hazards Center. “The new mapping will be better by incorporating multiple models at multiple scales and accuracies, enhancing our understanding of flooding in the region.”

By leveraging the capabilities of CRN members and partners, this project will advance the collaborative approach necessary to understand vulnerabilities, educate stakeholders and foster a unified strategy. The goal will be more effective infrastructure and land use planning, as well as water management practices that minimize risks from chronic and episodic flooding events.

NOAA’s Regional Coastal Resilience Grants focus on regional-scale projects that enhance the resilience of coastal communities and economies. “We are all connected by the watershed we live in,” said Jeff Payne, director of NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management. “What happens in one community affects those downstream. It can be widespread on regional local infrastructure, economies and ecosystems. A piecemeal approach will not be effective. Only by working together can we solve these complex problems.”

“The maps will give us more accurate data to predict how vulnerable we are and what the consequences could be,” said Mark Wilbert, emergency management director for the City of Charleston. “That enables us going forward to come up with better mitigation procedures based on better science.”

The CRN (http://www.charlestonresilience.net) is a regional public/private partnership formed in 2014 to support and improve resilience efforts in the region. Partners include the Consortium, City of Charleston, Charleston County, Charleston Water System, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (DHEC-OCRM), SCANA Corp. and Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Infrastructure Protection and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will provide advice.

Dan Burger, DHEC-OCRM Coastal Services division director, said the project “is an important step in the region’s effort to develop a common, localized understanding of its vulnerability to tidal and storm-related flooding.”

The resiliency grant’s lead investigators are Levine and Elizabeth Fly, Ph.D., coastal climate extension specialist with the Consortium. Levine will work with associates at College of Charleston, The Citadel, University of South Carolina, NOAA National Weather Service and NOAA Office for Coastal Management to create the detailed flood models.

The second phase of the project will focus on getting this information in the right hands and making sure it is understandable and easy to use for decision-makers throughout the Charleston region. Mayors, town administrators, business leaders and environmental advocates from the area signed a letter of support for the project.

The keys to this effort will be a series of CRN participatory workshops with stakeholders, to be led by Fly, and the expansion of the S.C. Coastal Information Network’s existing web portal. The web portal was created by the Consortium and local, state and federal partners to provide a one-stop location to find coastal-related information of interest to local communities. The website will be updated to enhance simple navigation through the extensive library of flooding and resiliency information, tools and resources, which are available at http://sccoastalinfo.org.

“This grant provides us the opportunity to expand the efforts of the CRN in a constructive and targeted manner,” Fly said. “Bringing together diverse groups of stakeholders to discuss flood and resilience issues based on the best available science and modeling will allow us to develop both a common language and common understanding of what our region may face in coming years, and how we can all work together to increase our resilience.”


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 2, 2016

RE: Taylor Re-Elected S.C. Sea Grant Board Chair
Contact:
Susan Ferris Hill, (843) 953-2078 or susan.ferris.hill@scseagrant.org

Col. Alvin A. TaylorCharleston, S.C.— Col. Alvin A. Taylor, director of S.C. Department of Natural Resources, has been re-elected chair of S.C. Sea Grant Consortium’s Board of Directors. Taylor began his second one-year term on January 1, 2016. “I am pleased to continue working with the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium by supporting research, education and outreach to conserve coastal resources and enhance opportunity for the people of South Carolina,” said Taylor.

Taylor serves as the chief administrator for the state’s natural resources agency with a staff of over 900 located across South Carolina. He graduated from Clemson University in 1976 with a bachelor’s in zoology. He completed training at the U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Training Center in Yorktown, Va., in 1976, and graduated from the S.C. Criminal Justice Academy in 1977.

“I look forward to working with Col. Taylor again this year in his role as board chairman,” said Rick DeVoe, executive director of the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium. “His leadership has been instrumental to the Consortium as we seek to further advance our programmatic efforts.”


Last updated: 1/12/2017 4:25:55 PM
2016 Archived News Releases

JUMP MENU

Page Tools Print this page
E-mail this page
Bookmark this page

Coastal Science Serving South Carolina
Copyright © 2001-2017 South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium
Turbulent Flow Image Courtesy of Prof. Haris J. Catrakis, University of California, Irvine
Privacy & Accessibility